News Archive

  • The New Jersey Division of Parks and Forestry officially launched a new smart device tool on November 16 to enhance visits to state parks by helping users plan visits around the state park system’s vast network of trails. The Trail Tracker application may be downloaded to smart devices to help visitors make detailed plans tailored to trails, activities and terrain that interest them.

  • Biological surveys conducted this year suggest American shad are making a strong comeback in the Delaware River, historically famous for a once-prodigious population of this important fish species.

  • The Arbor Day Foundation reports that 154 New Jersey communities have earned the prestigious Tree City USA award, placing New Jersey in the top five states with the most communities in this distinguished environmental program.

  • The state's network of Wildlife Management Areas has reached an important milestone with recent land acquisitions increasing the size of the system to 350,000 acres. To put this in perspective, New Jersey has more acreage in its Wildlife Management Area (WMA) system than its much larger neighbor New York State, and more than Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island combined.
     

  • The Christie Administration has awarded Perth Amboy $7.1 million in grants toward a project to convert a former scrap yard into a green space that will provide public access to the Raritan River and help improve water quality, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced today.

  • The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has launched a project to remove the obsolete Weston Mill Dam on the Millstone River between Manville and Franklin Township. This effort will open a stretch of the Somerset County waterway to migratory fish, enhance overall river health and improve safety for recreational use.

  • About 170 coastal communities across the nation will experience chronic flooding 20 years from now, disrupting people’s lives and daily routines, and forcing residents of those communities to make difficult and expensive decisions, according to a recent study by the Union of Concerned Scientists. In a moderate sea level rise scenario, cities and towns along the Delaware Bay and New Jersey coastlines could see between 15 and 40 percent of their land flooded at least 26 times each year by 2030.

  • The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has partnered with the Pennsylvania Natural Lands Trust and the Open Space Institute in order to acquire and preserve the 417-acre Girl Scouts of Central and Southern New Jersey’s Sheppards Mill property in Hopewell Township and Greenwich Township, Cumberland County for a total purchase of $1.26 million.

  • The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protectiosn Bureau of Graphic Information Systems has recently released the product of their latest efforts, the NJ Geo-Web 3.0 App. Users of this application can locate areas of interest, view and interact with NJDEP's GIS data, and query related environmental information. NJ-GeoWeb presents users with a suite of customized profiles to choose from, where they can work within a more tailored application that includes specific datasets, tools, searches, and reports developed to address the interests of the general public as well as  targeted users. 

  • The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection is reminding New Jersey residents and visitors that all lifeguarded ocean and bay beaches along the Atlantic Coast are currently open. The exception is for state-operated beaches at Island Beach State Park in Berkeley Township and Corson’s Inlet in Ocean City, due to the current shutdown of state government.