News Archive

  • The Department of Environmental Protection is advising recreational users of Ocean County’s Metedeconk River to exercise caution following confirmation of the presence of clinging jellyfish, a non-native species with a powerful sting, in this coastal waterway.

    In addition to the Metedeconk River, the DEP reminds recreational users of the Shrewsbury and Manasquan rivers – Monmouth County waterways where the clinging jellyfish had been confirmed in recent years – to be alert to its possible presence.

  • The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is hosting its annual Pequest Trout Hatchery and Natural Resource Education Center Open House and outdoors recreation flea market on Saturday, June 2 and Sunday, June 3.

    The free event, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days, showcases New Jersey’s natural resources, as well as the hatchery that raises trout stocked throughout the state. The hatchery is in Oxford, Warren County.

  • The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is providing property owners and outdoor enthusiasts with safety tips as black bears search for food after emerging from winter dens.

    “At this time of year, it is important for residents who live in New Jersey’s bear country to be aware of some steps they can follow to reduce the chances of a bear coming onto their properties,” said Assistant Commissioner for Natural and Historic Resources Ray Bukowski. “It is also a good time for anyone who spends time outdoors to become familiar with ways to stay safe.”

  • A contractor for the Department of Environmental Protection has completed an $18.4 million project to rebuild storm-damaged beaches and dunes in southern Long Beach Island while creating a safe navigation channel for nearby Little Egg Inlet.

    As a result, the DEP will place a request with the U.S. Coast Guard to mark the boating channel for the inlet, a major thoroughfare for boat traffic between southern Long Beach Island and Brigantine that had never been previously dredged.

  • The Department of Environmental Protection is seeking nominations for New Jersey Historic Preservation Awards, a prestigious honor that acknowledges the dedication of those whose work advances historic preservation in the Garden State.

    Each year, the awards program honors important contributions to the preservation of New Jersey’s historic and archaeological resources, as well as pioneering efforts in sustainability, historic preservation education, interpretive programs, and planning to preserve historic and archaeological resources.

  • Following up on his pledge to advance New Jersey as a national leader in addressing global warming, Governor Phil Murphy has formally notified governors of states that belong to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative of his administration’s commitment to rejoining the regional climate-change compact.

  • The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Parks and Forestry has launched a series of social media videos featuring music performed by the improvisational rock band Phish to promote outdoor recreation at New Jersey’s parks, forests and recreation areas.

  • Debbie Mans, who served as Energy Policy Advisor to Governor Jon Corzine, will become Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Environmental Protection effective February 14, Acting Commissioner Catherine R. McCabe announced today.

  • The Hackettstown State Fish Hatchery in Warren County stocked a record five million cold, cool, and warm water fish consisting of 15 species in 2017. The fish, totaling 5,082,841 with a total weight of more than 26,000 pounds, were produced at the location and many were stocked in approximately 200 waters throughout the state from March through November.

  • Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin announced a project that ultimately will transform 240 acres of Liberty State Park – closed to the public for decades due to low levels of contamination from historic fill – into a mosaic of freshwater wetlands, salt marshes, forests, and grasslands to benefit both people and wildlife.